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City reiterates need for businesses to follow the rules: City of Lake Ozark officials have a stern warning for businesses that sell alcohol within the city limits: Follow the rules or face possible suspension of your liquor license, or even worse your business license. A local bar/restaurant recently violated city code when an employee allowed patrons to consume alcohol outside the boundaries of the premises three days in a row without the proper licensing. The business owner had acquired the proper state license but had failed to obtain a catering license from the City of Lake Ozark. Both licenses are required by law before alcohol can be consumed off premises – even then, the exact boundaries of the off-premises consumption must be outlined in the catering license application. The issue arose when the bar/restaurant owner applied for a temporary catering license at the regular May 11 board of aldermen meeting for additional dates throughout the summer. The license was ultimately approved, but not before city staff and the Chief of Police scolded the bar/restaurant manager about the incident and warned him not to let it happen again. “It was made clear to that business that he had to have a local city permit, but still continued to serve alcohol in the parking lot in violation of Missouri law,” Police Chief Gary Launderville said. “I have a hard time with the board okaying anything for this business. The license clearly states that the business is subject to all ordinances of the City of Lake Ozark and that the owner and employees agree to that, yet he violated those rules Friday night, Saturday night and Sunday.” City Administrator Dave Van Dee reiterated that both state and city permits are required before alcohol can be served or consumed off the premises of a bar.  “The chief wants to know that the board understands that if it happens again the Police Department will issue citations and will forward the information to the proper state agency,” Van Dee said. City Attorney Christopher Rohrer confirmed the violation. He witnessed the incident Saturday night of that recent weekend and alerted the chief of police. Rohrer noted during the meeting that the police department is stretched well beyond its manpower with other issues and shouldn’t have to deal with permit violations when the owners or managers knowingly break the rules. The business manager, given an opportunity address the board, said it was a misunderstanding as to what constituted the bar’s premises. He assumed it included the tent outside the business. “The minute your patrons left your doorway and went to that tent, they crossed that line and put you and your license in jeopardy,” Van Dee said. The bar owner said there are posted signs that alert patrons about taking alcohol off the property. “I don’t see any ambiguity in this,” Mayor Dennis Newberry said. “It’s your job as business owner to know the rules and regulations.” Chief Launderville said he and his officers will be watching closely for any violations and will take appropriate action which could include a citation or shutting the business down. “From my perspective, we definitely want to support the businesses, but we also want to send a clear message that businesses must comply with our code,” Van Dee said. “We want to be user friendly and want businesses to be successful, but we have to have their cooperation and follow both state and local liquor laws. The responsibility is on the business owner, in my opinion.” The city administrator stressed that following the rules and regulations of both the city and state applies to all businesses, not just those that serve alcohol.   

TEST TW WEATHER

Stray, feral cats need some TLC, too

Despite the fickle weather we’ve come to tolerate at the Lake of the Ozarks, spring is a time of rebirth. First, it’s daffodils, then the ponds and lake come alive with spring peepers, dogwoods bloom and we’re finally sprinkled with oak pollen dust as our trees sprout their seasonal leaves.

It’s also birthing season for feral and stray cats.

Yes, there are homeless cats that roam the streets. Cats wandering around are not uncommon, especially in the area of The Strip where there is a constant source of food. They can sometimes be a pest, but most often they’re looking for food and some TLC.

Not to be alarmed. They have their place in the food chain.

According to the website Ally Cat Allies, feral, stray and pet cats are all members of the same species; they are all domestic cats. But stray cats and feral cats are also different from each other in a very important way — in their relationship to and interactions with people.

Whether you are a shelter worker, veterinarian, or feral cat advocate — or you just share your neighborhood with feral cats — knowing how to tell the difference can help inform how best to interact with a cat or what, if any, intervention would be in each cat’s best interest.

A “socialized” cat is one that is friendly towards people—or cats that enjoy companionship with us in our homes. 

Kittens becomes socialized by interacting with people—being held, spoken to, and played with—from an early age. If a kitten does not become accustomed to people holding her and petting her within this crucial window, she will grow up apprehensive of humans and will not be suited to or happy living in homes. 

What is the difference between a stray cat and a feral cat? 

Pet and stray cats are socialized to people. 

Feral cats are not socialized to people. While they are socialized to their colony members and bonded to each other, they do not have that same relationship with people. 

A stray cat is a cat that has been socialized to people at some point in her life, but has left or lost her domestic home, as well as most human contact and dependence. Over time, a stray cat can become feral as her contact with humans dwindles. 

Under the right circumstances, however, a stray cat can also become a pet cat once again. Stray cats that are re-introduced to a home after living outdoors may require a period of time to acclimate; they may be frightened and wary after spending time outside away from people. 

Again, don’t be alarmed if you see a cat or cats hanging around The Strip. They are hungry and they may want to be your friend. Ideally, cats should be neutered to help curb overpopulation. If you decide to bring a stray or feral cat into your home, or under your care, make sure you have him or her neutered. Contact any of a number of veterinarians, Dogwood Animal Shelter, Ozark Kats and K9 Shelter, Blue Moon Sanctuary or others.

To learn more about feral and stray cats, click on https://bit.ly/3twDcdH.