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Notice Regarding Recent Resignations: At the end of an executive session held at the October 25, 2022 City of Lake Ozark Board of Aldermen meeting, it was announced that letters of resignation had been accepted from both Municipal Judge Richelle Christensen and City Administrator David Mitchem.   Christensen’s resignation, effective December 31, was given in anticipation of her uncontested election to serve as the Camden County Prosecutor.  The letter was given in advance of this date so that a suitable replacement as municipal judge could be nominated and have ample time to prepare for the job.  It is anticipated that a nominee will be provided at the November 8 Board of Aldermen meeting, with work to begin for the new judge on January 1, 2023.   Administrator Mitchem had presented the Board of Aldermen with his letter of resignation, effective November 14, on October 12, with the Board formalizing the action at this meeting.  His notice references several successful projects from his year in the office, including identification of new revenue streams for the city, making amendments to building height restrictions to allow for development at an increased scale, and performing an assessment of employee recruitment and retention strategies.  He also cited his appreciation for the Board’s commitment to making the city more attractive for outside investment, while praising the professional staff’s skills and desire to be good public servants.  A successor to the position is expected to be named prior to Mitchem’s final day.   Of both Christensen and Mitchem’s announcements, Mayor Dennis Newberry stated “their time with the city, while different in length and workload, have transformed the way we deliver justice and do our key functions as a government.  Our board has appreciated working with both of them, and wishes them both the best in their next chapters while we welcome new team members to those roles.”

TEST TW WEATHER

Stray, feral cats need some TLC, too

Despite the fickle weather we’ve come to tolerate at the Lake of the Ozarks, spring is a time of rebirth. First, it’s daffodils, then the ponds and lake come alive with spring peepers, dogwoods bloom and we’re finally sprinkled with oak pollen dust as our trees sprout their seasonal leaves.

It’s also birthing season for feral and stray cats.

Yes, there are homeless cats that roam the streets. Cats wandering around are not uncommon, especially in the area of The Strip where there is a constant source of food. They can sometimes be a pest, but most often they’re looking for food and some TLC.

Not to be alarmed. They have their place in the food chain.

According to the website Ally Cat Allies, feral, stray and pet cats are all members of the same species; they are all domestic cats. But stray cats and feral cats are also different from each other in a very important way — in their relationship to and interactions with people.

Whether you are a shelter worker, veterinarian, or feral cat advocate — or you just share your neighborhood with feral cats — knowing how to tell the difference can help inform how best to interact with a cat or what, if any, intervention would be in each cat’s best interest.

A “socialized” cat is one that is friendly towards people—or cats that enjoy companionship with us in our homes. 

Kittens becomes socialized by interacting with people—being held, spoken to, and played with—from an early age. If a kitten does not become accustomed to people holding her and petting her within this crucial window, she will grow up apprehensive of humans and will not be suited to or happy living in homes. 

What is the difference between a stray cat and a feral cat? 

Pet and stray cats are socialized to people. 

Feral cats are not socialized to people. While they are socialized to their colony members and bonded to each other, they do not have that same relationship with people. 

A stray cat is a cat that has been socialized to people at some point in her life, but has left or lost her domestic home, as well as most human contact and dependence. Over time, a stray cat can become feral as her contact with humans dwindles. 

Under the right circumstances, however, a stray cat can also become a pet cat once again. Stray cats that are re-introduced to a home after living outdoors may require a period of time to acclimate; they may be frightened and wary after spending time outside away from people. 

Again, don’t be alarmed if you see a cat or cats hanging around The Strip. They are hungry and they may want to be your friend. Ideally, cats should be neutered to help curb overpopulation. If you decide to bring a stray or feral cat into your home, or under your care, make sure you have him or her neutered. Contact any of a number of veterinarians, Dogwood Animal Shelter, Ozark Kats and K9 Shelter, Blue Moon Sanctuary or others.

To learn more about feral and stray cats, click on https://bit.ly/3twDcdH.