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Food trucks coming to Lake Ozark: Food trucks will now be allowed to operate within the City of Lake Ozark. The board of aldermen approved an ordinance at its regular meeting July 27 setting in place the rules by which food vehicles and food vendors can operate. The major consideration is that food trucks cannot operate within the city’s only C-1 District, which encompasses only The Strip from near Christ the King Lutheran Church to the end of the city limits near Bagnell Dam. Vendors would not be allowed on public property, e.g., sidewalks, easements, rights of way, but only on private property. The path to final approval has included considerable discussion by the Planning and Zoning Commission, and by the board of aldermen at regular board meetings and a special workshop. The focus by the board and staff has been protecting existing brick and mortar food businesses on The Strip while encouraging new business within the city.  The only significant change from the original ordinance first considered in May involves food trucks/vendors participating during a special event. Those types of vendors can operate at city-authorized special events if the mobile unit is located totally within the property owned, occupied, or leased by the operators of the special event. It would be the responsibility of the official event organizer to recruit, monitor and control vendors present within its event space. Two individuals representing two Lake Ozark businesses spoke in favor of food trucks as they intend to allow those types of food services on their property. The board did vote to amend the proposed ordinance to reduce one distance regulation for food trucks from 500 feet to 300 feet of any licensed special event without the consent of the holder of the special event permit City Attorney Chris Rohrer said he learned at a recent Missouri Municipal League conference that there have been a number of court cases dealing with the validity of food truck ordinances especially in regard to distances. He said he wanted to make the board aware that 300 feet might be more palatable to the court if there is ever any litigation regarding the ordinance. In addition, a mobile food vendor cannot operate within 150 feet of the main entrance to any licensed business that sells food and/or beverages to the public.  Other Ordinance Highlights •Food trucks/vendors would be allowed in R-3 Multi-Family Dwelling District; C-2 General Commercial District; LMU-1 Lakefront Mixed Use District; M-1 Light Industrial District – but not the C-1 District (The Strip). •A mobile food vehicle is a licensed, motorized vehicle (aka food truck) that includes a self-contained or attached trailer kitchen in which food is prepared, processed, or stored and the vehicle is used to sell and dispense food to the public. •Mobile food vending activity and the locations are to be temporary and cannot be at any one location for more than 12 hours in any 24-hour period unless it as part of a special event.  •A mobile food vendor must have a current copy of its sales tax certificate, property use consent letter, the name of the vendor and length of the permit. •A food vendor must provide health department compliance and inspection reports, vehicle registration, a copy of the require city, county and state business licenses, and insurance and a food liability policy with $1 million limits. •A food vendor must provide a sanitation plan approved by the city’s public works director; must provide trash and recycling containers and keep the area within 25 feet of their food vending equipment cleared of trash. •A food vendor cannot have more than one 24x36 inch sign that is not physically attached to the food vending equipment.         

TEST TW WEATHER

Tiny Town should help address housing shortage

Pictured is Tiny Town developer Matt Wright. Behind him is the laundry facility and at left is one of the homes ready for roofing.

 

New residents of the tiny homes complex on School Road in Lake Ozark should be moving in within a couple of months.

Developer Matt Wright says he has a waiting list for the eight structures in Tiny Town which he hopes will help meet the critical need for affordable housing not only in Lake Ozark but in the Lake of the Ozarks area. The concept is new to Lake Ozark, and city officials had to create ordinances and guidelines for the homes which will be between 300 and 400 square feet each.

The city’s zoning code was adjusted to include tiny homes in R-3 (multi-family residential) districts.

The laundry facility is nearly complete, and one home is ready for roofing. Pads and utilities for the other homes have been installed. Midwest General Construction of Tipton is the general contractor. Premier Pyrotechnics of Richland and Rice Concrete of Sunrise Beach did the earthwork, utilities and concrete work.

 

Tiny homes/clusters defined

A tiny home is a detached, self-contained dwelling unit with basic functional areas that support normal daily routines such as cooking, sleeping and sanitation. The units must be between 300 and 800 square feet in total floor area, not including lofts. They must be built on-site on a permanent foundation and cannot exceed one story (excluding lofts).

A cluster of tiny homes is one that allows for the flexibility for creative design and superior scenic quality through preservation of sensitive environmental areas and efficient use of land. Instead of a conventional subdivision, which traditionally results in buildings spaced evenly throughout the site, cluster developments allow for individual lot and setback requirements to be reduced so a group or “cluster” of units can be developed on a portion of the site. A cluster must include no fewer than four nor more than 16 units.

There will be eight homes in the Tiny Town complex. 

The central space used by all occupants of the cluster should include storm shelters, mail receptacles and community recreational areas.

•All tiny homes must be connected to public utilities. 

•All cluster developments must comply with lot setbacks

•Cluster developments must be retained under common ownership including all tiny houses and common open spaces.

•Each unit should include at least two parking spaces with no on-street parking within the development.

•No more than three individuals can inhabit a tiny home.

•Units are one-bedroom with a loft.

•Stairways must not be less than 36 inches wide.

•Units must meet structural requirements as defined in the adopted ordinance. 

 

Harrison Fry, the city’s assistant city administrator and community development director, has guided the city as it developed the tiny homes regulations.

“The city’s tiny home code was built by reviewing the policies of 17 cities in 11 states.  We feel confident that this is a safe and affordable option necessary for our community’s growth, and this trend could fit in well in any town focused on community equity,” Fry offered. “A smaller footprint has lower costs for the builder and for a tenant. An affordable option for housing gives those workers the chance to save for the future without worrying about having to leave the area to seek a good life.”