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Notice Regarding Recent Resignations: At the end of an executive session held at the October 25, 2022 City of Lake Ozark Board of Aldermen meeting, it was announced that letters of resignation had been accepted from both Municipal Judge Richelle Christensen and City Administrator David Mitchem.   Christensen’s resignation, effective December 31, was given in anticipation of her uncontested election to serve as the Camden County Prosecutor.  The letter was given in advance of this date so that a suitable replacement as municipal judge could be nominated and have ample time to prepare for the job.  It is anticipated that a nominee will be provided at the November 8 Board of Aldermen meeting, with work to begin for the new judge on January 1, 2023.   Administrator Mitchem had presented the Board of Aldermen with his letter of resignation, effective November 14, on October 12, with the Board formalizing the action at this meeting.  His notice references several successful projects from his year in the office, including identification of new revenue streams for the city, making amendments to building height restrictions to allow for development at an increased scale, and performing an assessment of employee recruitment and retention strategies.  He also cited his appreciation for the Board’s commitment to making the city more attractive for outside investment, while praising the professional staff’s skills and desire to be good public servants.  A successor to the position is expected to be named prior to Mitchem’s final day.   Of both Christensen and Mitchem’s announcements, Mayor Dennis Newberry stated “their time with the city, while different in length and workload, have transformed the way we deliver justice and do our key functions as a government.  Our board has appreciated working with both of them, and wishes them both the best in their next chapters while we welcome new team members to those roles.”

TEST TW WEATHER

Tiny Town should help address housing shortage

Pictured is Tiny Town developer Matt Wright. Behind him is the laundry facility and at left is one of the homes ready for roofing.

 

New residents of the tiny homes complex on School Road in Lake Ozark should be moving in within a couple of months.

Developer Matt Wright says he has a waiting list for the eight structures in Tiny Town which he hopes will help meet the critical need for affordable housing not only in Lake Ozark but in the Lake of the Ozarks area. The concept is new to Lake Ozark, and city officials had to create ordinances and guidelines for the homes which will be between 300 and 400 square feet each.

The city’s zoning code was adjusted to include tiny homes in R-3 (multi-family residential) districts.

The laundry facility is nearly complete, and one home is ready for roofing. Pads and utilities for the other homes have been installed. Midwest General Construction of Tipton is the general contractor. Premier Pyrotechnics of Richland and Rice Concrete of Sunrise Beach did the earthwork, utilities and concrete work.

 

Tiny homes/clusters defined

A tiny home is a detached, self-contained dwelling unit with basic functional areas that support normal daily routines such as cooking, sleeping and sanitation. The units must be between 300 and 800 square feet in total floor area, not including lofts. They must be built on-site on a permanent foundation and cannot exceed one story (excluding lofts).

A cluster of tiny homes is one that allows for the flexibility for creative design and superior scenic quality through preservation of sensitive environmental areas and efficient use of land. Instead of a conventional subdivision, which traditionally results in buildings spaced evenly throughout the site, cluster developments allow for individual lot and setback requirements to be reduced so a group or “cluster” of units can be developed on a portion of the site. A cluster must include no fewer than four nor more than 16 units.

There will be eight homes in the Tiny Town complex. 

The central space used by all occupants of the cluster should include storm shelters, mail receptacles and community recreational areas.

•All tiny homes must be connected to public utilities. 

•All cluster developments must comply with lot setbacks

•Cluster developments must be retained under common ownership including all tiny houses and common open spaces.

•Each unit should include at least two parking spaces with no on-street parking within the development.

•No more than three individuals can inhabit a tiny home.

•Units are one-bedroom with a loft.

•Stairways must not be less than 36 inches wide.

•Units must meet structural requirements as defined in the adopted ordinance. 

 

Harrison Fry, the city’s assistant city administrator and community development director, has guided the city as it developed the tiny homes regulations.

“The city’s tiny home code was built by reviewing the policies of 17 cities in 11 states.  We feel confident that this is a safe and affordable option necessary for our community’s growth, and this trend could fit in well in any town focused on community equity,” Fry offered. “A smaller footprint has lower costs for the builder and for a tenant. An affordable option for housing gives those workers the chance to save for the future without worrying about having to leave the area to seek a good life.”