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City Services To Be Bid: At the June 29 Board of Aldermen meeting, Lake Ozark’s elected officials authorized two bidding processes that will have a significant impact on local residents. The first of these opportunities discussed is related to improving city streets. In April, the Board of Aldermen hired Miller Companies to establish a list of road maintenance projects to be paid for utilizing the city’s ARPA funds, and the road improvements reserve fund.  Over thirty roads throughout the community have been identified for the micro-paving project, given their current condition.  Miller Companies representative Ethan Shackelford states, “This type of project is designed to maintain and sustain the life of roads that are not yet in need of significant repair.  For some higher traffic streets, this can expand the life of the street for two or three years, but lower traffic residential streets may not need to be addressed for another eight years.”  After receiving this project report, the Board unanimously voted to issue an RFP for the project.  Bidding will open on July 4 and close on July 27.  City staff will begin crack sealing streets soon to prepare for the project. The city’s current solid waste contract with GFL Environmental was originally set to expire in 2022, but the contractor and Board of Aldermen elected to extend the contract through March of 2023 in their December 2021 meeting.  The Board of Aldermen opted on Tuesday to issue an RFP for a new solid waste contract to begin at the termination of the existing contract.  Among other items, bidders will be expected to identify operational plans, an ability to perform consistent routes throughout Lake Ozark, and what annual rate increases will look like for consumers.  Mayor Newberry commended Derrick Standley, a local resident with expertise in solid waste management, for his work in helping city staff and the Board determine what the bidding process and documents should entail. As the bidding process for both of these items closes, the Board of Aldermen will be expected to make a decision on who to award each of these contracts to, based on qualifications, ability, and pricing. 

TEST TW WEATHER

Tiny Town should help address housing shortage

Pictured is Tiny Town developer Matt Wright. Behind him is the laundry facility and at left is one of the homes ready for roofing.

 

New residents of the tiny homes complex on School Road in Lake Ozark should be moving in within a couple of months.

Developer Matt Wright says he has a waiting list for the eight structures in Tiny Town which he hopes will help meet the critical need for affordable housing not only in Lake Ozark but in the Lake of the Ozarks area. The concept is new to Lake Ozark, and city officials had to create ordinances and guidelines for the homes which will be between 300 and 400 square feet each.

The city’s zoning code was adjusted to include tiny homes in R-3 (multi-family residential) districts.

The laundry facility is nearly complete, and one home is ready for roofing. Pads and utilities for the other homes have been installed. Midwest General Construction of Tipton is the general contractor. Premier Pyrotechnics of Richland and Rice Concrete of Sunrise Beach did the earthwork, utilities and concrete work.

 

Tiny homes/clusters defined

A tiny home is a detached, self-contained dwelling unit with basic functional areas that support normal daily routines such as cooking, sleeping and sanitation. The units must be between 300 and 800 square feet in total floor area, not including lofts. They must be built on-site on a permanent foundation and cannot exceed one story (excluding lofts).

A cluster of tiny homes is one that allows for the flexibility for creative design and superior scenic quality through preservation of sensitive environmental areas and efficient use of land. Instead of a conventional subdivision, which traditionally results in buildings spaced evenly throughout the site, cluster developments allow for individual lot and setback requirements to be reduced so a group or “cluster” of units can be developed on a portion of the site. A cluster must include no fewer than four nor more than 16 units.

There will be eight homes in the Tiny Town complex. 

The central space used by all occupants of the cluster should include storm shelters, mail receptacles and community recreational areas.

•All tiny homes must be connected to public utilities. 

•All cluster developments must comply with lot setbacks

•Cluster developments must be retained under common ownership including all tiny houses and common open spaces.

•Each unit should include at least two parking spaces with no on-street parking within the development.

•No more than three individuals can inhabit a tiny home.

•Units are one-bedroom with a loft.

•Stairways must not be less than 36 inches wide.

•Units must meet structural requirements as defined in the adopted ordinance. 

 

Harrison Fry, the city’s assistant city administrator and community development director, has guided the city as it developed the tiny homes regulations.

“The city’s tiny home code was built by reviewing the policies of 17 cities in 11 states.  We feel confident that this is a safe and affordable option necessary for our community’s growth, and this trend could fit in well in any town focused on community equity,” Fry offered. “A smaller footprint has lower costs for the builder and for a tenant. An affordable option for housing gives those workers the chance to save for the future without worrying about having to leave the area to seek a good life.”