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Board, chief laud donor for support of LOPD: The outpouring of support for the Lake Ozark Police Department continues. Two weeks after Dennis Reese and Springfield Armory donated new weapons and accessories for every LOPD officer including reserves, a Lake Ozark businessman has donated $7,500 strictly for use by the department for the benefit of its officers. Police Chief Gary Launderville reported at the regular Sept. 14 board of aldermen meeting that George Tucker, owner of Tucker’s Shuckers on The Strip, handed him a check recently. The board then adopted a resolution expressing the city’s appreciation. Chief Launderville told the board that he took a call from Tucker about a month ago asking what he could do for LOPD officers. Tucker said he wanted to make sure any donation would go to LOPD officers. The chief explained that because of budgetary restrictions, any donation couldn’t be put in the in the city’s general fund with guarantees it would be used for the LOPD. He said Tucker insisted the money be used for the LOPD and not for general city expenses such as filling potholes. “I want this for the betterment of the police officers,” he told the chief. The only way that could happen, Launderville explained, was for a donation be made to the Lake Ozark Police Benevolent Police Association. “I was expecting a $500 check,” Launderville said. “About a week and a half later, George walked through the door with a $7,500 check. For a local businessman to step up and do something like that, the same as Denny Reese, and then you look at the donations we’ve received the last 30 days it’s amazing. Our department truly appreciates it.” Launderville noted that the donation is not a donation to the City of Lake Ozark but to a totally separate, non-profit organization for the betterment of the officers or the department. When equipment is not in the LOPD budget, the Benevolent Association steps up and helps, he explained.  “It benefits the City of Lake Ozark, it benefits the community,” Launderville said. “We don’t do fund raisers because Lord knows we don’t have time. We rely on donations and the goodwill of the community.”   The resolution It says: George Tucker has been instrumental in the redevelopment of the Bagnell Dam Strip, having established Tucker’s Shuckers Oysters & Tap and Neon Taco. The city would like to recognize Mr. Tucker’s community leadership, support and generosity to the city including a substantial donation of $7,500 recently made to the Police Benevolent Fund. The board of aldermen publicly expresses its appreciation to Mr. Tucker for his generosity to the police Benevolent Fund and his other contributions to our community.    

TEST TW WEATHER

Update: What you need to know about COVID

As the cases of COVID-19 in the lake area began to decline last spring, we hoped we’d never have to write another word about protecting the public and taking personal responsibility.

But COVID hit close to home last week when someone attending the standing-room-only July 27 board of aldermen meeting at the Lake Ozark City Hall informed us they had contracted the virus. We immediately posted a note on the city’s Facebook page and on our website to alert anyone who had attended.

In addition, the number of positive cases has increased in the lake area over the last few weeks according to the Miller County Health Center and Lake Regional Health System COVID dashboards.

City officials also reached out to Lake Regional for an update on COVID 19 guidelines.

The City of Lake Ozark has provided links to the Miller County Health Center and Lake Regional Health Systems every Monday for several weeks. These are the most reliable and local sources of information available. 

Miller County Health Center:

http://millercountyhealth.com/covid-19-dashboard

Lake Regional Health Systems:

https://www.lakeregional.com/health-resources/covid-19.

As always, we urge you to make informed, rational decisions and take personal responsibility in protecting not only yourselves but those around you.

 

What to consider  
(Note: Sources for the following in formation are the Center for Disease Control (CDC) and Lake Regional Health System in Osage Beach.)

•Getting vaccinated prevents severe illness, hospitalizations and death. •Unvaccinated people should get vaccinated and continue masking until they are fully vaccinated. With the Delta variant, this is more urgent than ever. The CDC has updated guidance for fully vaccinated people based on new evidence on the Delta variant. 

•Individuals who are vaccinated do not need to quarantine unless they have symptoms. 

•Symptoms are presenting a little differently than before. It isn’t just fever and loss of taste/smell. Symptoms can look more like regular sickness or allergies including headaches, scratchy throat, sore throat, minimal cough and body ache.

If you are fully vaccinated, you can participate in many of the activities that you did before the pandemic.

•To maximize protection from the Delta variant and prevent possibly spreading it to others, wear a mask indoors in public if you are in an area of substantial or high transmission.

•Wearing a mask is most important if you have a weakened immune system or if, because of your age or an underlying medical condition, you are at increased risk for severe disease, or if someone in your household has a weakened immune system, is at increased risk for severe disease, or is unvaccinated. If this applies to you or your household, you might choose to wear a mask regardless of the level of transmission in your area.

•You should continue to wear a mask where required by laws, rules, regulations, or local guidance.

 

Have you been fully vaccinated?

In general, people are considered fully vaccinated:

•Two weeks after their second dose in a two-dose series such as the Pfizer or Moderna vaccines, or;

•Two weeks after a single-dose vaccine such as Johnson & Johnson’s Janssen vaccine

•Anyone who does not meet these requirements, regardless of age, is NOT fully vaccinated. Keep taking all precautions until you are fully vaccinated.

•If you have a condition or are taking medications that weaken your immune system, you may NOT be protected even if you are fully vaccinated. You should continue to take all precautions recommended for unvaccinated people until advised otherwise by your healthcare provider.

 

If you’ve been fully vaccinated:

•You can resume activities that you did prior to the pandemic.

•To reduce the risk of being infected with the Delta variant and possibly spreading it to others, wear a mask indoors in public if you are in an area of substantial or high transmission.

•You might choose to wear a mask regardless of the level of transmission if you have a weakened immune system or if, because of your age or an underlying medical condition, you are at increased risk for severe disease, or if a member of your household has a weakened immune system, is at increased risk for severe disease, or is unvaccinated.

•If you travel in the United States, you do not need to get tested before or after travel or self-quarantine after travel.

•You need to pay close attention to the situation at your international destination before traveling outside the United States. 

•You do NOT need to get tested before leaving the United States unless your destination requires it.

•You still need to show a negative test result or documentation of recovery from COVID-19 before boarding an international flight to the United States.

•You should still get tested 3-5 days after international travel.

•You do NOT need to self-quarantine after arriving in the United States.

•If you’ve been around someone who has COVID-19, you should get tested 3-5 days after your exposure, even if you don’t have symptoms. You should also wear a mask indoors in public for 14 days following exposure or until your test result is negative. You should isolate for 10 days if your test result is positive.