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Boren Appointed Police Chief: In a special meeting held yesterday, the Lake Ozark Board of Aldermen formally appointed James Boren to serve as the City's next Police Chief.   James began his employment with the City of Lake Ozark 19 years ago as a dispatcher, and was sponsored by the City to attend the Police Academy. 17 years ago, he began his career as a police officer in Lake Ozark, climbing through the ranks of Corporal, Detective, Detective Sergeant, Lieutenant, and most recently as Interim Police Chief.   Regarding his new role, Chief Boren stated, "My goal for this department is to lead it with integrity and best serve the needs of our unique community. We will continue to strive for perfection, knowing it takes work from all of us, but I'm honored and thrilled to be able to lead this department in that direction."

Tiny Town should help address housing shortage

Pictured is Tiny Town developer Matt Wright. Behind him is the laundry facility and at left is one of the homes ready for roofing.

 

New residents of the tiny homes complex on School Road in Lake Ozark should be moving in within a couple of months.

Developer Matt Wright says he has a waiting list for the eight structures in Tiny Town which he hopes will help meet the critical need for affordable housing not only in Lake Ozark but in the Lake of the Ozarks area. The concept is new to Lake Ozark, and city officials had to create ordinances and guidelines for the homes which will be between 300 and 400 square feet each.

The city’s zoning code was adjusted to include tiny homes in R-3 (multi-family residential) districts.

The laundry facility is nearly complete, and one home is ready for roofing. Pads and utilities for the other homes have been installed. Midwest General Construction of Tipton is the general contractor. Premier Pyrotechnics of Richland and Rice Concrete of Sunrise Beach did the earthwork, utilities and concrete work.

 

Tiny homes/clusters defined

A tiny home is a detached, self-contained dwelling unit with basic functional areas that support normal daily routines such as cooking, sleeping and sanitation. The units must be between 300 and 800 square feet in total floor area, not including lofts. They must be built on-site on a permanent foundation and cannot exceed one story (excluding lofts).

A cluster of tiny homes is one that allows for the flexibility for creative design and superior scenic quality through preservation of sensitive environmental areas and efficient use of land. Instead of a conventional subdivision, which traditionally results in buildings spaced evenly throughout the site, cluster developments allow for individual lot and setback requirements to be reduced so a group or “cluster” of units can be developed on a portion of the site. A cluster must include no fewer than four nor more than 16 units.

There will be eight homes in the Tiny Town complex. 

The central space used by all occupants of the cluster should include storm shelters, mail receptacles and community recreational areas.

•All tiny homes must be connected to public utilities. 

•All cluster developments must comply with lot setbacks

•Cluster developments must be retained under common ownership including all tiny houses and common open spaces.

•Each unit should include at least two parking spaces with no on-street parking within the development.

•No more than three individuals can inhabit a tiny home.

•Units are one-bedroom with a loft.

•Stairways must not be less than 36 inches wide.

•Units must meet structural requirements as defined in the adopted ordinance. 

 

Harrison Fry, the city’s assistant city administrator and community development director, has guided the city as it developed the tiny homes regulations.

“The city’s tiny home code was built by reviewing the policies of 17 cities in 11 states.  We feel confident that this is a safe and affordable option necessary for our community’s growth, and this trend could fit in well in any town focused on community equity,” Fry offered. “A smaller footprint has lower costs for the builder and for a tenant. An affordable option for housing gives those workers the chance to save for the future without worrying about having to leave the area to seek a good life.”